177th Fire Dept. responds to crash

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 177th Fighter Wing Fire Department as well as local first responders extract a car crash victim and place him on a stretcher on Dec. 4, 2014 in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. The vehicle was involved in a head-on collision, and crashed into the airport fence. (Courtesy photo, Michael Ein, Press of Atlantic City)

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 177th Fighter Wing Fire Department as well as local first responders extract a car crash victim and place him on a stretcher on Dec. 4, 2014 in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. The vehicle was involved in a head-on collision, and crashed into the airport fence. (Courtesy photo, Michael Ein, Press of Atlantic City)

ATLANTIC CITY AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, N.J. -- Airmen assigned to the 177th Fighter Wing's Fire Department, Station 24-2, responded to a two-car collision outside the main gate on Dec. 4 at 6:46 P.M.

Responding personnel included Staff Sgt. Jason Adams and Airman 1st Class Patrick McColgan along with Assistant Chief Ron Wilkens and Ryan Brennan. Other emergency response units in the community included South Jersey Transportation Authority Station 24-1 along with the Egg Harbor Township Police Department.

"Our fire fighters performed the patient extrication using hydraulic rescue tools off of Rescue 26", said Senior Master Sgt. Brian Alexander, Chief of the 177th FW Fire Emergency Services.  "We removed the driver's side B post, rear door and front seat", added Wilkens. "(The) Patient was removed and transferred to EMS.  The guys did a great job." 

Station 24-2 consists of enlisted members of 177th FW in addition to New Jersey state employees.  The organization conducts specialized training exercises, such as vehicle extraction, airport familiarization and hazmat training to familiarize themselves with procedures and equipment.

During their time in basic military training and throughout their careers, Airmen are taught the importance of remaining calm in an emergency situation and focusing on the task at hand.

"Remember your training and keep calm", said Adams. "Then you will be able to go back to your basics to assess the scene and complete the task at hand safely. If someone you are trying to help sees you calm, maintaining your composure, they are more likely to be calm as well."